Senator Dick Black called her “a woman of loathsome character.” What does that make Dick Black?
http://ncronline.org/blogs/ncr-today/responses-senator-who-called-day-woman-loathsome-character
Dorothy Day in Tivoli, New York, 1970. Photo by Bob Fitch.

Senator Dick Black called her “a woman of loathsome character.” What does that make Dick Black?

http://ncronline.org/blogs/ncr-today/responses-senator-who-called-day-woman-loathsome-character

Dorothy Day in Tivoli, New York, 1970. Photo by Bob Fitch.

The Catonsville Nine: David Darst, Tom Lewis, Fr. Philip Berrigan, George Mische, and John Hogan (pictured). May 17, 1968. Photo by Chris Farlekas.

The Catonsville Nine: David Darst, Tom Lewis, Fr. Philip Berrigan, George Mische, and John Hogan (pictured). May 17, 1968. Photo by Chris Farlekas.

"War Resistance at Home: The Catonsville Nine" from A People’s History of American Empire by Howard Zinn, Paul Buhle, and Mike Konopacki.

"War Resistance at Home: The Catonsville Nine" from A People’s History of American Empire by Howard Zinn, Paul Buhle, and Mike Konopacki.

vietnamwarera:

Cardinal Francis Spellman, Apostolic Vicar for the US Armed Forces, is given more appropriate head gear aboard the USS Ticonderoga during his visit to troops in Vietnam, 1965. Spellman favored the war in Vietnam, and believed it to be a “war for civilization”.

vietnamwarera:

Cardinal Francis Spellman, Apostolic Vicar for the US Armed Forces, is given more appropriate head gear aboard the USS Ticonderoga during his visit to troops in Vietnam, 1965. Spellman favored the war in Vietnam, and believed it to be a “war for civilization”.

The Catonsville Nine: David Darst, Marjorie Melville, Tom Lewis, George Mische, Fr. Philip Berrigan, John Hogan, Tom Melville, Fr. Daniel Berrigan, and Mary Moylan. (William L. Laforce, May 17, 1968)

"Thumb(s) Down," Alan Kaplan, Catonsville, Md., May 17, 1968. Check out this very nice review of HIT & STAY in the Baltimore Brew.

"Thumb(s) Down," Alan Kaplan, Catonsville, Md., May 17, 1968. Check out this very nice review of HIT & STAY in the Baltimore Brew.

April 29, 1971: four people entered a draft office in Evanston, IL, destroyed 500 1-A draft records by pouring blood on them, and then waited peacefully to be arrested. They called themselves The Four of Us. According to activist Thom Clark, it was important that the action was “not a drive-by action, but a stand-by action.” This was the last known hit and stay draft board raid—after hit and split had become the standard of the second wave of actions.

Eileen Kreutz, John Baranski, Mary Beth Lubbers, and Thomas Clark. You can listen to a radio-play about the Four of Us here

AMERICA IS HARD TO FIND

"On the very day he was scheduled to begin his prison term, [Daniel Berrigan] left his office keys on a secretary’s desk in Anabel Taylor Hall and disappeared." —Anke Wessels, director of Cornell’s Center for Religion, Ethics, and Social Policy 

Cornell celebrated Berrigan’s impending imprisonment for his involvement in the Catonsville Nine action by conducting a weekend-long “America Is Hard to Find” event on April 17–19, 1970, which included a public appearance by the then-fugitive Berrigan before a crowd of 15,000 in Barton Hall. Also scheduled to appear were Phil Ochs, Judy Collins, Country Joe and the Fish, and Bread and Puppet Theatre.

Berrigan evaded FBI agents, who were present in large numbers, by climbing into one of the 15-foot tall puppets, walking out of the venue, and into a getaway car. 

Read more at Coleman’s blog http://www.spokesinthewheel.com/Excerpts/AmericaIsHardToFind.htm

Cover art for the re-issued album “America Is Hard To Find.” Bread and Puppet Theatre photo by Bob Fitch.

Support the D.C. Nine, “One of the members of the protesting group hurls files through a smashed window of the Dow Chemical office.” March 22, 1969.

Support the D.C. Nine, “One of the members of the protesting group hurls files through a smashed window of the Dow Chemical office.” March 22, 1969.